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The ReadME Project

THE README PODCAST // EPISODE 21

Build your own luck

A new co-host, a new format, a functional programming renaissance, and strategies to increase your luck.

Featured Article

Building the future of the command line

Open source developers are making the command line more friendly—and more powerful.

Aaron Francis

Sometimes they say yes

Aaron on playing it uncool, advocating for yourself, and asking for your dream job.

Frances Coronel // Byteboard

ONWARD: A framework for maintaining maintainers

Whether the project has 3 or 3000 contributors, here’s what to focus on when collaborating with other maintainers.

Hillel Wayne

The five-minute feedback fix

Writing directly-testable design requirements can help deliver high-quality software faster, and with less frustration.

The ReadME Project amplifies the voices of the developer community by telling stories about:

Justin Watts // Telus

Shift security left in one day

It’s getting easier and more intuitive to catch mistakes before they spiral into disasters.

Chrissy LeMaire // dbatools

Coding peace of mind: A guide to testing

Say goodbye to accidentally deleted data and faulty committed changes with this GItHub Actions framework.

Aaron Francis // Tuple

Publishing your work increases your luck

For every snarky comment, there are 10x as many people admiring your work.

Featured Article

Functional programming is finally going mainstream

Object-oriented and imperative programming aren’t going away, but functional programming is finding its way into more codebases.

Kara Carrell

Stewards of code, stewards of each other

Kara on supporting, sharing, and contributing to the contributors of open source.

The ReadMe Podcast

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THE README PODCAST // EPISODE 20

Hosts in the hot seat

Neha and Brian turn the interview tables on each other.

THE README PODCAST // EPISODE 19

freeCodeCamp: For curious people, by curious people

Founder Quincy on his journey from journalist to OSS pioneer.

Featured Articles

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Don’t call it a comeback: Why Java is still champ

Far from dead, the perpetually-popular language is up to speed and ready for the future.

Developer Stories

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Jonathan Leitschuh // his security research work

The thrill of open source security

Jonathan finds broken things and fixes them to make the world a more secure place.

Frances Coronel

Great leaders create more leaders

Frances on building community, gaining social capital, and embracing your identity.

Mahmoud Hashemi

Driven by conversation and connection

Mahmoud on projects for the public good, sticky challenges, and the purity of open source.

Karthik Iyer

The art of learning a little about a lot

Karthik goes with the flow, follows his passions, and gives back to the community.

Guides

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swyx | @swyx

Breaking apart the monolith

The open source movement should really be modeled after social clubs and city governments.

James Turnbull

Build a CI/CD workflow with Github Actions

Catch issues and remove the need for manual processes so you can focus on adding features.

Sabrina Li // FullStory

Keep separate codebases in sync with GitHub Actions

Boost developer productivity by automating manual tasks.

Rose Judge // VMware

Configuring your Git environment for success

A quick-start guide to less frustration and better workflows.

About The
ReadME Project

Coding is usually seen as a solitary activity, but it’s actually the world’s largest community effort led by open source maintainers, contributors, and teams. These unsung heroes put in long hours to build software, fix issues, field questions, and manage communities.

The ReadME Project is part of GitHub’s ongoing effort to amplify the voices of the developer community. It’s an evolving space to engage with the community and explore the stories, challenges, technology, and culture that surround the world of open source.

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Nominate inspiring developers and projects you think we should feature in The ReadME Project.

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Recognize developers working behind the scenes and help open source projects get the resources they need.